Description

Purpose & Fit

Primarily used for grazing applications due to high moisture content, Antler Chicory will accumulate minerals naturally. A good source of the trace minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, and sodium, Antler Chicory will also help control gastrointestinal nematodes. A natural wormer, Antler Chicory will also reduce manure odors. When properly managed, Antler chicory leaves are higher in nutritional and mineral content than alfalfa or other cool-season grasses. A deep taproot provides access to moisture during drought conditions. Growth rates from April through October can average up to 50 lb. per acre per day. Although Antler Chicory flower stems are less digestible than the leaves, lamb trials have recorded gains of 0.6 lb. per day and 820 lb. per acre. Fresian bulls have seen 2 lb. a day gains when grazing Antler Chicory—a great replacement to supplement the traditional ‘summer slump’ of other cool-season forage species.

Growth Pattern

Antler Chicory is a low growing rosette plant with broad leaves during the winter. Winter dormant, large numbers of leaves will form from the crown during the spring and reach 6 ft. in height if left ungrazed.

Interseeding

Frost seed Antler Chicory seed into existing pastures by broadcast seeding during the late winter or early spring when soils freeze at night but thaw during the day. The freezing and melting of ice in the ground will create channels for seeds to fill and germinate. Make sure seed is broadcast early in the day before soils fully thaw to ensure success.

Did You Know?

Although newly used as a forage crop in the United States, chicory has been used in other countries for over 300 years as a coffee substitute, a leafy vegetable, and a pasture forage.

Seeds/Lb: 426,000

Antler

Chicory

Cichorium intybus

Description

Purpose & Fit

Primarily used for grazing applications due to high moisture content, Antler Chicory will accumulate minerals naturally. A good source of the trace minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, and sodium, Antler Chicory will also help control gastrointestinal nematodes. A natural wormer, Antler Chicory will also reduce manure odors. When properly managed, Antler chicory leaves are higher in nutritional and mineral content than alfalfa or other cool-season grasses. A deep taproot provides access to moisture during drought conditions. Growth rates from April through October can average up to 50 lb. per acre per day. Although Antler Chicory flower stems are less digestible than the leaves, lamb trials have recorded gains of 0.6 lb. per day and 820 lb. per acre. Fresian bulls have seen 2 lb. a day gains when grazing Antler Chicory—a great replacement to supplement the traditional ‘summer slump’ of other cool-season forage species.

Growth Pattern

Antler Chicory is a low growing rosette plant with broad leaves during the winter. Winter dormant, large numbers of leaves will form from the crown during the spring and reach 6 ft. in height if left ungrazed.

Interseeding

Frost seed Antler Chicory seed into existing pastures by broadcast seeding during the late winter or early spring when soils freeze at night but thaw during the day. The freezing and melting of ice in the ground will create channels for seeds to fill and germinate. Make sure seed is broadcast early in the day before soils fully thaw to ensure success.

Did You Know?

Although newly used as a forage crop in the United States, chicory has been used in other countries for over 300 years as a coffee substitute, a leafy vegetable, and a pasture forage.

Seeds/Lb: 426,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Primarily used for grazing applications due to high moisture content, Antler Chicory will accumulate minerals naturally. A good source of the trace minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, and sodium, Antler Chicory will also help control gastrointestinal nematodes. A natural wormer, Antler Chicory will also reduce manure odors. When properly managed, Antler chicory leaves are higher in nutritional and mineral content than alfalfa or other cool-season grasses. A deep taproot provides access to moisture during drought conditions. Growth rates from April through October can average up to 50 lb. per acre per day. Although Antler Chicory flower stems are less digestible than the leaves, lamb trials have recorded gains of 0.6 lb. per day and 820 lb. per acre. Fresian bulls have seen 2 lb. a day gains when grazing Antler Chicory—a great replacement to supplement the traditional ‘summer slump’ of other cool-season forage species.

Growth Pattern

Antler Chicory is a low growing rosette plant with broad leaves during the winter. Winter dormant, large numbers of leaves will form from the crown during the spring and reach 6 ft. in height if left ungrazed.

Interseeding

Frost seed Antler Chicory seed into existing pastures by broadcast seeding during the late winter or early spring when soils freeze at night but thaw during the day. The freezing and melting of ice in the ground will create channels for seeds to fill and germinate. Make sure seed is broadcast early in the day before soils fully thaw to ensure success.

Did You Know?

Although newly used as a forage crop in the United States, chicory has been used in other countries for over 300 years as a coffee substitute, a leafy vegetable, and a pasture forage.

Seeds/Lb: 426,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Antler Chicory prefers moderately drained soils with medium to high fertility levels. It is drought tolerant thanks to a deep taproot that will keep it performing even when many other forages succumb to the summer heat. Both tolerant of moderate acidity and low fertility, wet soils are a problem for Antler Chicory.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  50°F – 80°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Antler Chicory prefers moderately drained soils with medium to high fertility levels. It is drought tolerant thanks to a deep taproot that will keep it performing even when many other forages succumb to the summer heat. Both tolerant of moderate acidity and low fertility, wet soils are a problem for Antler Chicory.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  50°F – 80°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Antler Chicory prefers moderately drained soils with medium to high fertility levels. It is drought tolerant thanks to a deep taproot that will keep it performing even when many other forages succumb to the summer heat. Both tolerant of moderate acidity and low fertility, wet soils are a problem for Antler Chicory.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  50°F – 80°F

Establishment

Planting

Spring drill seed into a moist, firm seedbed as early as possible in the season to avoid slug damage to seedlings. Uniform depth of planting is essential and, if broadcasting, utilize a cultipacker on seedbeds before and after seeding.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp:  60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Stands with fewer than 5 live plants per square foot should be overseeded.

Monoculture: 4 – 5 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Spring drill seed into a moist, firm seedbed as early as possible in the season to avoid slug damage to seedlings. Uniform depth of planting is essential and, if broadcasting, utilize a cultipacker on seedbeds before and after seeding.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp:  60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Stands with fewer than 5 live plants per square foot should be overseeded.

Monoculture: 4 – 5 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Spring drill seed into a moist, firm seedbed as early as possible in the season to avoid slug damage to seedlings. Uniform depth of planting is essential and, if broadcasting, utilize a cultipacker on seedbeds before and after seeding.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp:  60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Stands with fewer than 5 live plants per square foot should be overseeded.

Monoculture: 4 – 5 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

The greatest challenge of managing an Antler Chicory pasture is controlling bolt. Utilize rotational stocking, and reset the growth pattern as needed by defoliating the seed stalk back to the ground. Rest periods are essential, but it will re-grow quickly and be grazed multiple times throughout the growing season. Once bolt occurs, production is reduced for the rest of the season or until stems are mowed.

Earliest Time To Graze: 80″ – 100″

Fertilizer Requirements

Always make sure animals are on hand to graze back the explosion of growth from nitrogen fertilization. Minimize phosphorus as an abundance of phosphorus tends to make Antler Chicory bolt.

At Planting: 35 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Antler Chicory can usually recover from damage and has a growth rate that can outcompete most weeds.

Minimum Graze Height: 1.5″ – 2.0″ (first year), 6.0″ (subsequent years)

Rest Period: 24 days (1st year, less after establishment)

Mixes

Antler Chicory will not spread or reliably re-seed itself and is best grown with grasses or legumes that will fill in gaps that appear in the chicory population when the stand declines.

  • Red Clover
  • White Clover
  • Orchardgrass
  • Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 6

Management

Grazing

The greatest challenge of managing an Antler Chicory pasture is controlling bolt. Utilize rotational stocking, and reset the growth pattern as needed by defoliating the seed stalk back to the ground. Rest periods are essential, but it will re-grow quickly and be grazed multiple times throughout the growing season. Once bolt occurs, production is reduced for the rest of the season or until stems are mowed.

Earliest Time To Graze: 80″ – 100″

Fertilizer Requirements

Always make sure animals are on hand to graze back the explosion of growth from nitrogen fertilization. Minimize phosphorus as an abundance of phosphorus tends to make Antler Chicory bolt.

At Planting: 35 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Antler Chicory can usually recover from damage and has a growth rate that can outcompete most weeds.

Minimum Graze Height: 1.5″ – 2.0″ (first year), 6.0″ (subsequent years)

Rest Period: 24 days (1st year, less after establishment)

Mixes

Antler Chicory will not spread or reliably re-seed itself and is best grown with grasses or legumes that will fill in gaps that appear in the chicory population when the stand declines.

  • Red Clover
  • White Clover
  • Orchardgrass
  • Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 6

Management

Grazing

The greatest challenge of managing an Antler Chicory pasture is controlling bolt. Utilize rotational stocking, and reset the growth pattern as needed by defoliating the seed stalk back to the ground. Rest periods are essential, but it will re-grow quickly and be grazed multiple times throughout the growing season. Once bolt occurs, production is reduced for the rest of the season or until stems are mowed.

Earliest Time To Graze: 80″ – 100″

Fertilizer Requirements

Always make sure animals are on hand to graze back the explosion of growth from nitrogen fertilization. Minimize phosphorus as an abundance of phosphorus tends to make Antler Chicory bolt.

At Planting: 35 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Antler Chicory can usually recover from damage and has a growth rate that can outcompete most weeds.

Minimum Graze Height: 1.5″ – 2.0″ (first year), 6.0″ (subsequent years)

Rest Period: 24 days (1st year, less after establishment)

Mixes

Antler Chicory will not spread or reliably re-seed itself and is best grown with grasses or legumes that will fill in gaps that appear in the chicory population when the stand declines.

  • Red Clover
  • White Clover
  • Orchardgrass
  • Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 6

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Antler Chicory, when managed well, will have a stand life of 5 – 7 years.

Competitiveness

Antler Chicory is not very competitive, and herbicide options are limited. Reduce weed pressure before planting. If weeds become a problem, mowing can help with weed suppression.

Risks

Naturally produced chemicals in chicory that assist in controlling nematodes can also taint milk. Dairy animals should not be allowed to graze chicory within 2 hours of milking. Although chicory usually is palatable, occasionally, animals will be reluctant to eat it due to the bitterness of the same compounds that affect the nematodes and milk flavor. Nitrate poisoning can occur in chicory. Observe cattle closely when conditions that promote nitrate poisoning occur. Mitigate risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Antler Chicory.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Downy Mildew
  • Fusarium Wilt
  • Septoria Blight
  • White Mold
  • Bacterial Soft Rot
  • Bottom Rot
  • Damping-Off

Pests

  • Slugs
  • Snails
  • Aphids
  • Darkling Beetles
  • Flea Beetles
  • Leaf Miners
  • Loopers
  • Thrips

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Antler Chicory, when managed well, will have a stand life of 5 – 7 years.

Competitiveness

Antler Chicory is not very competitive, and herbicide options are limited. Reduce weed pressure before planting. If weeds become a problem, mowing can help with weed suppression.

Risks

Naturally produced chemicals in chicory that assist in controlling nematodes can also taint milk. Dairy animals should not be allowed to graze chicory within 2 hours of milking. Although chicory usually is palatable, occasionally, animals will be reluctant to eat it due to the bitterness of the same compounds that affect the nematodes and milk flavor. Nitrate poisoning can occur in chicory. Observe cattle closely when conditions that promote nitrate poisoning occur. Mitigate risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Antler Chicory.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Downy Mildew
  • Fusarium Wilt
  • Septoria Blight
  • White Mold
  • Bacterial Soft Rot
  • Bottom Rot
  • Damping-Off

Pests

  • Slugs
  • Snails
  • Aphids
  • Darkling Beetles
  • Flea Beetles
  • Leaf Miners
  • Loopers
  • Thrips

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Antler Chicory, when managed well, will have a stand life of 5 – 7 years.

Competitiveness

Antler Chicory is not very competitive, and herbicide options are limited. Reduce weed pressure before planting. If weeds become a problem, mowing can help with weed suppression.

Risks

Naturally produced chemicals in chicory that assist in controlling nematodes can also taint milk. Dairy animals should not be allowed to graze chicory within 2 hours of milking. Although chicory usually is palatable, occasionally, animals will be reluctant to eat it due to the bitterness of the same compounds that affect the nematodes and milk flavor. Nitrate poisoning can occur in chicory. Observe cattle closely when conditions that promote nitrate poisoning occur. Mitigate risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Antler Chicory.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Downy Mildew
  • Fusarium Wilt
  • Septoria Blight
  • White Mold
  • Bacterial Soft Rot
  • Bottom Rot
  • Damping-Off

Pests

  • Slugs
  • Snails
  • Aphids
  • Darkling Beetles
  • Flea Beetles
  • Leaf Miners
  • Loopers
  • Thrips

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

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