Description

Purpose & Fit

With up to 25% protein in its leaves, Bayou Kale is an excellent deer food plot component. Rich in vitamins A, C, and the B group, Bayou Kale has a high feeding value and is equivalent to early spring grass in quality with high crude protein between 16% and 18%. Bayou Kale will grow better in colder weather and has a cold tolerance higher than any other brassica species. A frost will also sweeten the leaves and increase palatability. Bayou Kale is a fantastic follow-up to grass & white clover grazing, allowing animals to continue grazing later into the winter months. Kale can achieve maturity in as little as 90 days and will allow for two crops a year. Winter killed if not pastured closely, Bayou Kale is rich in minerals such as potassium and calcium and will accumulate sulfur over time.

Growth Pattern

Although root systems are shallow, Bayou Kale plants can grow to a height of up to 2½ feet.

Interseeding

Provided adequate moisture, Bayou Kale will make both fall and spring pasture. With irrigated conditions, oats or barley can be sown in the spring and used for pasture after grain removal. It’s also possible to plant into a crop of early corn at the last cultivation.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 175,000

Bayou

Kale

Brassica oleracea

Description

Purpose & Fit

With up to 25% protein in its leaves, Bayou Kale is an excellent deer food plot component. Rich in vitamins A, C, and the B group, Bayou Kale has a high feeding value and is equivalent to early spring grass in quality with high crude protein between 16% and 18%. Bayou Kale will grow better in colder weather and has a cold tolerance higher than any other brassica species. A frost will also sweeten the leaves and increase palatability. Bayou Kale is a fantastic follow-up to grass & white clover grazing, allowing animals to continue grazing later into the winter months. Kale can achieve maturity in as little as 90 days and will allow for two crops a year. Winter killed if not pastured closely, Bayou Kale is rich in minerals such as potassium and calcium and will accumulate sulfur over time.

Growth Pattern

Although root systems are shallow, Bayou Kale plants can grow to a height of up to 2½ feet.

Interseeding

Provided adequate moisture, Bayou Kale will make both fall and spring pasture. With irrigated conditions, oats or barley can be sown in the spring and used for pasture after grain removal. It’s also possible to plant into a crop of early corn at the last cultivation.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 175,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

With up to 25% protein in its leaves, Bayou Kale is an excellent deer food plot component. Rich in vitamins A, C, and the B group, Bayou Kale has a high feeding value and is equivalent to early spring grass in quality with high crude protein between 16% and 18%. Bayou Kale will grow better in colder weather and has a cold tolerance higher than any other brassica species. A frost will also sweeten the leaves and increase palatability. Bayou Kale is a fantastic follow-up to grass & white clover grazing, allowing animals to continue grazing later into the winter months. Kale can achieve maturity in as little as 90 days and will allow for two crops a year. Winter killed if not pastured closely, Bayou Kale is rich in minerals such as potassium and calcium and will accumulate sulfur over time.

Growth Pattern

Although root systems are shallow, Bayou Kale plants can grow to a height of up to 2½ feet.

Interseeding

Provided adequate moisture, Bayou Kale will make both fall and spring pasture. With irrigated conditions, oats or barley can be sown in the spring and used for pasture after grain removal. It’s also possible to plant into a crop of early corn at the last cultivation.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 175,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Plant Bayou Kale in sandy loam to light clay soils. Intolerant of waterlogged conditions, Bayou Kale prefers mild, moist climates with deep, rich, mellow soils. Palatability goes down with warmer weather, but it can survive in temperatures down to 10°F.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  45°F – 75°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Plant Bayou Kale in sandy loam to light clay soils. Intolerant of waterlogged conditions, Bayou Kale prefers mild, moist climates with deep, rich, mellow soils. Palatability goes down with warmer weather, but it can survive in temperatures down to 10°F.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  45°F – 75°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Plant Bayou Kale in sandy loam to light clay soils. Intolerant of waterlogged conditions, Bayou Kale prefers mild, moist climates with deep, rich, mellow soils. Palatability goes down with warmer weather, but it can survive in temperatures down to 10°F.

Soil pH:  5.5 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  45°F – 75°F

Establishment

Planting

Due to Bayou Kale’s rapid growth rate, good dry matter production can occur within 150 days under ideal conditions. Sow Bayou Kale as early as possible into firm, moist soils to increase dry matter yields.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 4 – 7 days

Ideal Temp:  50°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 8 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Due to Bayou Kale’s rapid growth rate, good dry matter production can occur within 150 days under ideal conditions. Sow Bayou Kale as early as possible into firm, moist soils to increase dry matter yields.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 4 – 7 days

Ideal Temp:  50°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 8 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Due to Bayou Kale’s rapid growth rate, good dry matter production can occur within 150 days under ideal conditions. Sow Bayou Kale as early as possible into firm, moist soils to increase dry matter yields.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 4 – 7 days

Ideal Temp:  50°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 8 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

At an average consumption rate of 50 lbs. per cow per day, 2 acres of Bayou kale will feed 100 cows for one month. Chopping, hand-feeding, or limiting grazing to a few hours a day will help avoid trampling damage. If planted in the spring and grazed in the late summer (with time for regrowth), it is possible to produce a good crop for late winter or early spring grazing. Grazing can occur for an entire growing season provided enough plant remains after a rotational graze to allow for recovery.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply 20 lbs. sulfur per acre before planting or as a spring top dressing when fall planted. Use caution with nitrogen applications as too much nitrogen can cause nitrate poisoning.

At Planting: 50 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Provided kale isn’t grazed past the bud needed for regrowth during the fall (located near the surface of the soil), Kale will recover and be ready for spring grazing as well.

Minimum Graze Height: 3″

Rest Period: 21 days

Mixes

  • Annual Ryegrass
  • Oats
  • Red Clover

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 10

Management

Grazing

At an average consumption rate of 50 lbs. per cow per day, 2 acres of Bayou kale will feed 100 cows for one month. Chopping, hand-feeding, or limiting grazing to a few hours a day will help avoid trampling damage. If planted in the spring and grazed in the late summer (with time for regrowth), it is possible to produce a good crop for late winter or early spring grazing. Grazing can occur for an entire growing season provided enough plant remains after a rotational graze to allow for recovery.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply 20 lbs. sulfur per acre before planting or as a spring top dressing when fall planted. Use caution with nitrogen applications as too much nitrogen can cause nitrate poisoning.

At Planting: 50 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Provided kale isn’t grazed past the bud needed for regrowth during the fall (located near the surface of the soil), Kale will recover and be ready for spring grazing as well.

Minimum Graze Height: 3″

Rest Period: 21 days

Mixes

  • Annual Ryegrass
  • Oats
  • Red Clover

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 10

Management

Grazing

At an average consumption rate of 50 lbs. per cow per day, 2 acres of Bayou kale will feed 100 cows for one month. Chopping, hand-feeding, or limiting grazing to a few hours a day will help avoid trampling damage. If planted in the spring and grazed in the late summer (with time for regrowth), it is possible to produce a good crop for late winter or early spring grazing. Grazing can occur for an entire growing season provided enough plant remains after a rotational graze to allow for recovery.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply 20 lbs. sulfur per acre before planting or as a spring top dressing when fall planted. Use caution with nitrogen applications as too much nitrogen can cause nitrate poisoning.

At Planting: 50 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 50 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Provided kale isn’t grazed past the bud needed for regrowth during the fall (located near the surface of the soil), Kale will recover and be ready for spring grazing as well.

Minimum Graze Height: 3″

Rest Period: 21 days

Mixes

  • Annual Ryegrass
  • Oats
  • Red Clover

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 10

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Bayou Kale is not meant to be utilized as a permanent pasture but can last up to two years.

Competitiveness

Due to later germination, weeds may get a jump on kale and increase weed pressure. Scutch grass, docks, and thistles, in particular, can cause problems when growing Bayou Kale.

Risks

Nitrogen may accumulate in plants, and feed comprised of large amounts of Bayou Kale may taint milk. High selenium or iodine supplements are helpful for some animals when fed a diet of Bayou kale. Goitrogen levels in flowering plants make them unsuitable for dry cows. Animals should be slowly acclimated to mitigate occurrences of nitrate poisoning and other risks.

Diseases

  • Alternaria Leaf Spot
  • Anthracnose
  • Damping-Off
  • Downy Mildew
  • Black Rot

Pests

  • Flea Beetles
  • Diamond Black Moths
  • Beet Armyworm
  • Cabbage Aphid
  • Cabbage Looper
  • Cutworms
  • Cabbageworm
  • Thrips
  • Root-Knot Nematode

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Bayou Kale is not meant to be utilized as a permanent pasture but can last up to two years.

Competitiveness

Due to later germination, weeds may get a jump on kale and increase weed pressure. Scutch grass, docks, and thistles, in particular, can cause problems when growing Bayou Kale.

Risks

Nitrogen may accumulate in plants, and feed comprised of large amounts of Bayou Kale may taint milk. High selenium or iodine supplements are helpful for some animals when fed a diet of Bayou kale. Goitrogen levels in flowering plants make them unsuitable for dry cows. Animals should be slowly acclimated to mitigate occurrences of nitrate poisoning and other risks.

Diseases

  • Alternaria Leaf Spot
  • Anthracnose
  • Damping-Off
  • Downy Mildew
  • Black Rot

Pests

  • Flea Beetles
  • Diamond Black Moths
  • Beet Armyworm
  • Cabbage Aphid
  • Cabbage Looper
  • Cutworms
  • Cabbageworm
  • Thrips
  • Root-Knot Nematode

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Bayou Kale is not meant to be utilized as a permanent pasture but can last up to two years.

Competitiveness

Due to later germination, weeds may get a jump on kale and increase weed pressure. Scutch grass, docks, and thistles, in particular, can cause problems when growing Bayou Kale.

Risks

Nitrogen may accumulate in plants, and feed comprised of large amounts of Bayou Kale may taint milk. High selenium or iodine supplements are helpful for some animals when fed a diet of Bayou kale. Goitrogen levels in flowering plants make them unsuitable for dry cows. Animals should be slowly acclimated to mitigate occurrences of nitrate poisoning and other risks.

Diseases

  • Alternaria Leaf Spot
  • Anthracnose
  • Damping-Off
  • Downy Mildew
  • Black Rot

Pests

  • Flea Beetles
  • Diamond Black Moths
  • Beet Armyworm
  • Cabbage Aphid
  • Cabbage Looper
  • Cutworms
  • Cabbageworm
  • Thrips
  • Root-Knot Nematode

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

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