Boston

Plantain

Plantago lanceolata

Technical Data Sheet
Technical Data Sheet

Boston

Plantain

Plantago lanceolata

Boston

Plantain

Plantago lanceolata

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Purpose & Fit

Boston Plantain is high in vitamins, trace minerals, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatories giving it an edge over many other traditionally planted forage species. Boston Plantain contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, selenium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and cobalt. Retention of these minerals by grazing animals is more elevated than retention rates of animals grazing other species. Both the taproot and a fibrous root system of Boston Plantain will allow it to compete in many different environments, including those with heavy clay soils. Via chemical secretion, Boston Plantain, is both a slug and snail deterrent. Once established, the Boston plantain will provide a consistent source of forage high in protein throughout the year. Highly palatable, Boston Plantain risks selective grazing ahead of most legumes and grasses.

Sheep grazing Boston Plantain will demonstrate a higher intake vs. endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, but require increased chewing and rumination activity than perennial ryegrass. Boston Plantain can slow down rumen microflora activity, but not permanently impair rumen function due to active bio compounds. Changes to the rumen’s volatile fatty acid composition may improve animal productivity and milk composition. Plantain can be fed to weaned piglets up to 8% DM of their diet without a performance loss.
Plantain will provide control over most animal worms, coccidiosis, e-Coli, and salmonella. Gastrointestinal parasites in animals fed plantain have lower live egg counts, resulting in increases in the animal’s live weight.

In pure swards, Boston Plantain has generally given live weight gains equal to or less than endophyte-free perennial ryegrass. Bloat can be mitigated by grazing animals on Boston Plantain, and meat flavor will remain unaffected.

Growth Pattern

Boston plantain is a stemless plant with a thick rhizome and fibrous roots.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 249,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Purpose & Fit
Boston Plantain is high in vitamins, trace minerals, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatories giving it an edge over many other traditionally planted forage species. Boston Plantain contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, selenium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and cobalt. Retention of these minerals by grazing animals is more elevated than retention rates of animals grazing other species. Both the taproot and a fibrous root system of Boston Plantain will allow it to compete in many different environments, including those with heavy clay soils. Via chemical secretion, Boston Plantain, is both a slug and snail deterrent. Once established, the Boston plantain will provide a consistent source of forage high in protein throughout the year. Highly palatable, Boston Plantain risks selective grazing ahead of most legumes and grasses.

Sheep grazing Boston Plantain will demonstrate a higher intake vs. endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, but require increased chewing and rumination activity than perennial ryegrass. Boston Plantain can slow down rumen microflora activity, but not permanently impair rumen function due to active bio compounds. Changes to the rumen’s volatile fatty acid composition may improve animal productivity and milk composition. Plantain can be fed to weaned piglets up to 8% DM of their diet without a performance loss.

Plantain will provide control over most animal worms, coccidiosis, e-Coli, and salmonella. Gastrointestinal parasites in animals fed plantain have lower live egg counts, resulting in increases in the animal’s live weight. In pure swards, Boston Plantain has generally given live weight gains equal to or less than endophyte-free perennial ryegrass. Bloat can be mitigated by grazing animals on Boston Plantain, and meat flavor will remain unaffected.

Growth Pattern

Boston plantain is a stemless plant with a thick rhizome and fibrous roots.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 249,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

 Boston Plantain is high in vitamins, trace minerals, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatories giving it an edge over many other traditionally planted forage species. Boston Plantain contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, selenium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and cobalt. Retention of these minerals by grazing animals is more elevated than retention rates of animals grazing other species. Both the taproot and a fibrous root system of Boston Plantain will allow it to compete in many different environments, including those with heavy clay soils. Via chemical secretion, Boston Plantain, is both a slug and snail deterrent. Once established, the Boston plantain will provide a consistent source of forage high in protein throughout the year. Highly palatable, Boston Plantain risks selective grazing ahead of most legumes and grasses.

Sheep grazing Boston Plantain will demonstrate a higher intake vs. endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, but require increased chewing and rumination activity than perennial ryegrass. Boston Plantain can slow down rumen microflora activity, but not permanently impair rumen function due to active bio compounds. Changes to the rumen’s volatile fatty acid composition may improve animal productivity and milk composition. Plantain can be fed to weaned piglets up to 8% DM of their diet without a performance loss.

Plantain will provide control over most animal worms, coccidiosis, e-Coli, and salmonella. Gastrointestinal parasites in animals fed plantain have lower live egg counts, resulting in increases in the animal’s live weight. In pure swards, Boston Plantain has generally given live weight gains equal to or less than endophyte-free perennial ryegrass. Bloat can be mitigated by grazing animals on Boston Plantain, and meat flavor will remain unaffected.

Growth Pattern

Boston plantain is a stemless plant with a thick rhizome and fibrous roots.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 249,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Drought and heat tolerant, Boston Plantain will grow in soils suited to ryegrass and white clover. Plantain is common under low fertility conditions, especially on grounds low in phosphorus or potassium. Boston Plantain will not withstand saline or swampy soils.

Soil pH: 4.2 – 7.8

Optimum Growth Range: 50°F – 80°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Drought and heat tolerant, Boston Plantain will grow in soils suited to ryegrass and white clover. Plantain is common under low fertility conditions, especially on grounds low in phosphorus or potassium. Boston Plantain will not withstand saline or swampy soils.

Soil pH: 4.2 – 7.8

Optimum Growth Range: 50°F – 80°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Drought and heat tolerant, Boston Plantain will grow in soils suited to ryegrass and white clover. Plantain is common under low fertility conditions, especially on grounds low in phosphorus or potassium. Boston Plantain will not withstand saline or swampy soils.

Soil pH: 4.2 – 7.8

Optimum Growth Range: 50°F – 80°F

Establishment

Planting

Broadcast seeding, no-tilling, or conventional drilling are all options for sowing Boston Plantain.

Seeding Depth: ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 50°F – 77°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 8 – 10 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Broadcast seeding, no-tilling, or conventional drilling are all options for sowing Boston Plantain.

Seeding Depth: ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 50°F – 77°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 8 – 10 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Broadcast seeding, no-tilling, or conventional drilling are all options for sowing Boston Plantain.

Seeding Depth: ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 50°F – 77°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 8 – 10 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

Plantain as a monoculture is palatable to cattle but is more appealing when mixed with grasses and legumes. Grazing can begin when the leaf tears before the plants pull out of the ground.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 8″

Fertilizer Requirements

Although Boston Plantain is responsive to nitrogen fertilization, consistent applications will increase grasses while decreasing the plantain population.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 6-8 weeks

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 2” – 3”

Rest Period: 20 days

Mixes

Use Boston Plantain in mixtures where slower establishing grasses are present. The live weight gain of lambs grazed on a mix of plantain with red and white clover has been greater than ryegrass-clover, tall fescue-clover, and cocksfoot-clover, but less than a chicory and clover mix by at least 10%. Grow plantain in mixtures instead of monocultures to realize full benefits. When monocultures are grown, plantain roots shallower than when grown in a mix with other species. The difference in rooting depth can lead to a one and a half times yield gain for plantain in mix vs. those grown in monocultures.

  • Antler Chicory
  • Grazemore Festulolium
  • Ladino White Clover
  • Brutus Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 4+

Management

Grazing

Plantain as a monoculture is palatable to cattle but is more appealing when mixed with grasses and legumes. Grazing can begin when the leaf tears before the plants pull out of the ground.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 8″

Fertilizer Requirements

Although Boston Plantain is responsive to nitrogen fertilization, consistent applications will increase grasses while decreasing the plantain population.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 6-8 weeks

Hay or Silage?

Not Recommended

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 2” – 3”

Rest Period: 20 days

Mixes

Use Boston Plantain in mixtures where slower establishing grasses are present. The live weight gain of lambs grazed on a mix of plantain with red and white clover has been greater than ryegrass-clover, tall fescue-clover, and cocksfoot-clover, but less than a chicory and clover mix by at least 10%. Grow plantain in mixtures instead of monocultures to realize full benefits. When monocultures are grown, plantain roots shallower than when grown in a mix with other species. The difference in rooting depth can lead to a one and a half times yield gain for plantain in mix vs. those grown in monocultures.

  • Antler Chicory
  • Grazemore Festulolium
  • Ladino White Clover
  • Brutus Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 4+

Management

Grazing

Plantain as a monoculture is palatable to cattle but is more appealing when mixed with grasses and legumes. Grazing can begin when the leaf tears before the plants pull out of the ground.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 8″

Fertilizer Requirements

Although Boston Plantain is responsive to nitrogen fertilization, consistent applications will increase grasses while decreasing the plantain population.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 6-8 weeks

Hay or Silage

Not Recommended

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 2” – 3”

Rest Period: 20 days

Mixes

Use Boston Plantain in mixtures where slower establishing grasses are present. The live weight gain of lambs grazed on a mix of plantain with red and white clover has been greater than ryegrass-clover, tall fescue-clover, and cocksfoot-clover, but less than a chicory and clover mix by at least 10%. Grow plantain in mixtures instead of monocultures to realize full benefits. When monocultures are grown, plantain roots shallower than when grown in a mix with other species. The difference in rooting depth can lead to a one and a half times yield gain for plantain in mix vs. those grown in monocultures.

  • Antler Chicory
  • Grazemore Festulolium
  • Ladino White Clover
  • Brutus Tall Fescue

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 4+

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Boston Plantain’s ability to persist as a permanent pasture component is dependent on its ability to compete with the other species present in the sward. Factors that will affect its longevity include fertility level, grazing management, other pasture species, and other factors. It will persist better in lower fertility areas with more extended grazing or cutting intervals and less competitive companion species.

Competitiveness

The competitive abilities of Boston Plantain are dependent on fertility. Low fertility areas will see plantain thrive more than shallow-rooted grasses. However, as fertility increases, grasses begin to compete more readily.

Risks

Overgrazing can be an issue. Graze before flowering and not close to emergence when palatability is highest. Mitigate additional risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Boston Plantain. Plantain has the potential to outcompete other desirable plants depending on the environment and management.

Diseases

  • Leaf Spot
  • Root Rot Diseases

Pests

  • Weevils
  • Gall midges
  • Flea Beetles

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Boston Plantain’s ability to persist as a permanent pasture component is dependent on its ability to compete with the other species present in the sward. Factors that will affect its longevity include fertility level, grazing management, other pasture species, and other factors. It will persist better in lower fertility areas with more extended grazing or cutting intervals and less competitive companion species.

Competitiveness

The competitive abilities of Boston Plantain are dependent on fertility. Low fertility areas will see plantain thrive more than shallow-rooted grasses. However, as fertility increases, grasses begin to compete more readily.

Risks

Overgrazing can be an issue. Graze before flowering and not close to emergence when palatability is highest. Mitigate additional risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Boston Plantain. Plantain has the potential to outcompete other desirable plants depending on the environment and management.

Diseases

  • Leaf Spot
  • Root Rot Diseases

Pests

  • Weevils
  • Gall midges
  • Flea Beetles

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Boston Plantain’s ability to persist as a permanent pasture component is dependent on its ability to compete with the other species present in the sward. Factors that will affect its longevity include fertility level, grazing management, other pasture species, and other factors. It will persist better in lower fertility areas with more extended grazing or cutting intervals and less competitive companion species.

Competitiveness

The competitive abilities of Boston Plantain are dependent on fertility. Low fertility areas will see plantain thrive more than shallow-rooted grasses. However, as fertility increases, grasses begin to compete more readily.

Risks

Overgrazing can be an issue. Graze before flowering and not close to emergence when palatability is highest. Mitigate additional risks by gradually introducing a diet that includes Boston Plantain. Plantain has the potential to outcompete other desirable plants depending on the environment and management.

Diseases

  • Leaf Spot
  • Root Rot Diseases

Pests

  • Weevils
  • Gall midges
  • Flea Beetles

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience