Description

Purpose & Fit

With higher fiber content than other grains, barley is a versatile forage crop with many uses.  Barley straw (especially six-row barleys with the highest protein content) can be used as feed for ruminants, as a bedding material or excellent in the reclamation of saline soils.  Barley will need to be rolled, flaked, ground, or pelleted in order to break the bran layer for proper efficiency when being used as feed.  High levels of starch give barley a good dry matter content with a similar protein amount to wheat, but higher than maize.  Generally high in fiber content, hulless varieties contain half the fiber content of hulled varieties and 1% – 2% more protein.  Hulless varieties are also more digestible and less bulky.  Compared with other cereal grains, barley is higher in digestible amino acids.  Barley is especially beneficial to ruminants with high gross energy content and high energy digestibility.  Although barley contains more phosphorus than other grains, that phosphorus has high bioavailability and can help reduce phosphorus excretion.  A shorter growing season of 60 – 70 days and ripening before harsh conditions occur means the areas where barley can be planted extends further north and south than other forage crops.  Barley will flower and mature earlier than wheat and enable producers who double-crop to get an earlier head start.

Growth Pattern

Barley grows up to 4 ft. high with a strong fibrous root system.  Seminal roots grow as deep as 7 ft. and provide anchoring while adventitious roots gather nutrients for the plant. Barley has more tillers than wheat, oats, or rye.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Because barley has a short time to maturity, Barley can be grown at higher altitudes than any other cereal grain.  Barley is grown in the arctic circle.  Barley is grown in the Sahara Desert.  Barley can even be grown in the Himalayas.

Seeds/Lb: 13,000 – 15,000

Barley

Description

Purpose & Fit

With higher fiber content than other grains, barley is a versatile forage crop with many uses.  Barley straw (especially six-row barleys with the highest protein content) can be used as feed for ruminants, as a bedding material or excellent in the reclamation of saline soils.  Barley will need to be rolled, flaked, ground, or pelleted in order to break the bran layer for proper efficiency when being used as feed.  High levels of starch give barley a good dry matter content with a similar protein amount to wheat, but higher than maize.  Generally high in fiber content, hulless varieties contain half the fiber content of hulled varieties and 1% – 2% more protein.  Hulless varieties are also more digestible and less bulky.  Compared with other cereal grains, barley is higher in digestible amino acids.  Barley is especially beneficial to ruminants with high gross energy content and high energy digestibility.  Although barley contains more phosphorus than other grains, that phosphorus has high bioavailability and can help reduce phosphorus excretion.  A shorter growing season of 60 – 70 days and ripening before harsh conditions occur means the areas where barley can be planted extends further north and south than other forage crops.  Barley will flower and mature earlier than wheat and enable producers who double-crop to get an earlier head start.

Growth Pattern

Barley grows up to 4 ft. high with a strong fibrous root system.  Seminal roots grow as deep as 7 ft. and provide anchoring while adventitious roots gather nutrients for the plant. Barley has more tillers than wheat, oats, or rye.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Because barley has a short time to maturity, Barley can be grown at higher altitudes than any other cereal grain.  Barley is grown in the arctic circle.  Barley is grown in the Sahara Desert.  Barley can even be grown in the Himalayas.

Seeds/Lb: 13,000 – 15,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

With higher fiber content than other grains, barley is a versatile forage crop with many uses.  Barley straw (especially six-row barleys with the highest protein content) can be used as feed for ruminants, as a bedding material or excellent in the reclamation of saline soils.  Barley will need to be rolled, flaked, ground, or pelleted in order to break the bran layer for proper efficiency when being used as feed.  High levels of starch give barley a good dry matter content with a similar protein amount to wheat, but higher than maize.  Generally high in fiber content, hulless varieties contain half the fiber content of hulled varieties and 1% – 2% more protein.  Hulless varieties are also more digestible and less bulky.  Compared with other cereal grains, barley is higher in digestible amino acids.  Barley is especially beneficial to ruminants with high gross energy content and high energy digestibility.  Although barley contains more phosphorus than other grains, that phosphorus has high bioavailability and can help reduce phosphorus excretion.  A shorter growing season of 60 – 70 days and ripening before harsh conditions occur means the areas where barley can be planted extends further north and south than other forage crops.  Barley will flower and mature earlier than wheat and enable producers who double-crop to get an earlier head start.

Growth Pattern

Barley grows up to 4 ft. high with a strong fibrous root system.  Seminal roots grow as deep as 7 ft. and provide anchoring while adventitious roots gather nutrients for the plant. Barley has more tillers than wheat, oats, or rye.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Because barley has a short time to maturity, Barley can be grown at higher altitudes than any other cereal grain.  Barley is grown in the arctic circle.  Barley is grown in the Sahara Desert.  Barley can even be grown in the Himalayas.

Seeds/Lb: 13,000 – 15,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Although less winter-hardy than wheat, barley has the ability to tolerate higher and drier climates than other cereal grains including wheat and oats.  Barley is best suited to well-drained, fertile loams, or light clay soils, and performance is better on alkaline soils than on acidic soils.  Tolerant of saline soils (up to 1%), barley is also tolerant of heat, but the heat must be dry heat as humidity will create disease issues.  Waterlogging is not tolerated by barley.  If not properly protected by snow, cover crop residues, or bred for cold tolerance barley will have a tendency to winterkill.

Soil pH:  5.2 – 8.3

Optimum Growth Range:  32°F+

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Although less winter-hardy than wheat, barley has the ability to tolerate higher and drier climates than other cereal grains including wheat and oats.  Barley is best suited to well-drained, fertile loams, or light clay soils, and performance is better on alkaline soils than on acidic soils.  Tolerant of saline soils (up to 1%), barley is also tolerant of heat, but the heat must be dry heat as humidity will create disease issues.  Waterlogging is not tolerated by barley.  If not properly protected by snow, cover crop residues, or bred for cold tolerance barley will have a tendency to winterkill.

Soil pH:  5.2 – 8.3

Optimum Growth Range:  32°F+

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Although less winter-hardy than wheat, barley has the ability to tolerate higher and drier climates than other cereal grains including wheat and oats.  Barley is best suited to well-drained, fertile loams, or light clay soils, and performance is better on alkaline soils than on acidic soils.  Tolerant of saline soils (up to 1%), barley is also tolerant of heat, but the heat must be dry heat as humidity will create disease issues.  Waterlogging is not tolerated by barley.  If not properly protected by snow, cover crop residues, or bred for cold tolerance barley will have a tendency to winterkill.

Soil pH:  5.2 – 8.3

Optimum Growth Range:  32°F+

Establishment

Planting

Plant earlier than the appropriate dates to plant wheat in your area to ensure good establishment and root development prior to winter dormancy.  Follow at least a two-year rotation with crops other than small grains. Barley requires a firm seedbed.

Seeding Depth: 1″ – 1½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 8 days

Ideal Temp:  40°F – 55°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 120 – 150 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Plant earlier than the appropriate dates to plant wheat in your area to ensure good establishment and root development prior to winter dormancy.  Follow at least a two-year rotation with crops other than small grains. Barley requires a firm seedbed.

Seeding Depth: 1″ – 1½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 8 days

Ideal Temp:  40°F – 55°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 120 – 150 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Plant earlier than the appropriate dates to plant wheat in your area to ensure good establishment and root development prior to winter dormancy.  Follow at least a two-year rotation with crops other than small grains. Barley requires a firm seedbed.

Seeding Depth: 1″ – 1½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 8 days

Ideal Temp:  40°F – 55°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 120 – 150 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

Barley provides more fall pasture than wheat or rye, and early planting means an earlier start to grazing.  Remove cattle from pastures before the onset of jointing (when the first node and head emerge above ground level).

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Fertilization recommendations are similar to wheat for an area.  Excess nitrogen increases the possibility of lodging and promotes growth that’s detrimental to winter survival.  There may also be issues with excessively high protein.

At Planting: 20 Lb/A N – 30 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 4 – 6 weeks

Hay or Silage?

Timing: 58 – 65 days after planting

Cuttings During Season: 2 – 3

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 12″

Rest Period: 2 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Peas

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2.7

Management

Grazing

Barley provides more fall pasture than wheat or rye, and early planting means an earlier start to grazing.  Remove cattle from pastures before the onset of jointing (when the first node and head emerge above ground level).

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Fertilization recommendations are similar to wheat for an area.  Excess nitrogen increases the possibility of lodging and promotes growth that’s detrimental to winter survival.  There may also be issues with excessively high protein.

At Planting: 20 Lb/A N – 30 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 4 – 6 weeks

Hay or Silage?

Timing: 58 – 65 days after planting

Cuttings During Season: 2 – 3

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 12″

Rest Period: 2 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Peas

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2.7

Management

Grazing

Barley provides more fall pasture than wheat or rye, and early planting means an earlier start to grazing.  Remove cattle from pastures before the onset of jointing (when the first node and head emerge above ground level).

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Fertilization recommendations are similar to wheat for an area.  Excess nitrogen increases the possibility of lodging and promotes growth that’s detrimental to winter survival.  There may also be issues with excessively high protein.

At Planting: 20 Lb/A N – 30 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N every 4 – 6 weeks

Hay or Silage?

Timing: 58 – 65 days after planting

Cuttings During Season: 2 – 3

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 12″

Rest Period: 2 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Peas

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2.7

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Barley will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Barley is competitive with a quick maturity.

Risks

High in starch value, but low protein value, include barley grain at 40% or less dry matter. Avoid waxy barley for use with pigs or poultry.  Lambs are the only animal that doesn’t require additional processing of barley before feeding.  Dry rolling increases rumen digestibility by 16% and starch digestibility by 37%.  Additional processing methods that increase starch and rumen digestibility include roasting, aldehyde treatment, and ammonia. Awned barley may cause irritation and result in stomatitis in horses, cattle, and poultry.  Barley grain is susceptible to scab under hot and humid conditions and in turn, result in the production of mycotoxins.  Weight loss, lower feed conversion, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, severe dermatitis, and death are all signs of toxicosis.  Harvested grain containing greater than 5% infected kernels can contain enough toxin to be harmful to humans and animals.  Barley also contains Pentosans and should not be utilized for poultry.

Diseases

  • Leaf Rust
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Net Blotch
  • Septoria Leaf Blotch
  • Bacterial Stripe Blight
  • Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Aphids
  • Fall Armyworm
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Variegated Cutworms
  • Wireworms
  • Hessian Flies
  • False Chinch Bugs

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Barley will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Barley is competitive with a quick maturity.

Risks

High in starch value, but low protein value, include barley grain at 40% or less dry matter. Avoid waxy barley for use with pigs or poultry.  Lambs are the only animal that doesn’t require additional processing of barley before feeding.  Dry rolling increases rumen digestibility by 16% and starch digestibility by 37%.  Additional processing methods that increase starch and rumen digestibility include roasting, aldehyde treatment, and ammonia. Awned barley may cause irritation and result in stomatitis in horses, cattle, and poultry.  Barley grain is susceptible to scab under hot and humid conditions and in turn, result in the production of mycotoxins.  Weight loss, lower feed conversion, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, severe dermatitis, and death are all signs of toxicosis.  Harvested grain containing greater than 5% infected kernels can contain enough toxin to be harmful to humans and animals.  Barley also contains Pentosans and should not be utilized for poultry.

Diseases

  • Leaf Rust
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Net Blotch
  • Septoria Leaf Blotch
  • Bacterial Stripe Blight
  • Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Aphids
  • Fall Armyworm
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Variegated Cutworms
  • Wireworms
  • Hessian Flies
  • False Chinch Bugs

Pests & Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Barley will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Barley is competitive with a quick maturity.

Risks

High in starch value, but low protein value, include barley grain at 40% or less dry matter. Avoid waxy barley for use with pigs or poultry.  Lambs are the only animal that doesn’t require additional processing of barley before feeding.  Dry rolling increases rumen digestibility by 16% and starch digestibility by 37%.  Additional processing methods that increase starch and rumen digestibility include roasting, aldehyde treatment, and ammonia. Awned barley may cause irritation and result in stomatitis in horses, cattle, and poultry.  Barley grain is susceptible to scab under hot and humid conditions and in turn, result in the production of mycotoxins.  Weight loss, lower feed conversion, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, severe dermatitis, and death are all signs of toxicosis.  Harvested grain containing greater than 5% infected kernels can contain enough toxin to be harmful to humans and animals.  Barley also contains Pentosans and should not be utilized for poultry.

Diseases

  • Leaf Rust
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Net Blotch
  • Septoria Leaf Blotch
  • Bacterial Stripe Blight
  • Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Aphids
  • Fall Armyworm
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Variegated Cutworms
  • Wireworms
  • Hessian Flies
  • False Chinch Bugs

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

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