Bounty

Annual Ryegrass

Lolium multiflorum

Technical Data Sheet
Technical Data Sheet

Bounty

Annual Ryegrass

Lolium multiflorum

Bounty

Annual Ryegrass

Lolium multiflorum

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Purpose & Fit

Commonly used for overseeding into warm-season perennial ryegrass, Bounty annual ryegrass can be utilized to extend grazing seasons by three months or more for ranchers. Bounty annual ryegrass has demonstrated the ability to provide some control over soil nematodes. Highly palatable and capable of producing longer into the colder months than many other forage species, Bounty annual ryegrass is excellent for late winter and spring grazing while allowing animals to maintain exceptionally high dry matter intake. Situations containing poorly drained soils that cannot grow small grains can be productive by utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for silage and hay. In a situation resulting in stand loss, Bounty annual ryegrass can be seeded or reseeded as late as December or January. Growth will slow when average temperatures drop below 45°F.

Growth Pattern

Annual ryegrass grows in a bunch pattern with stiffer leaves near the base of the plant. When left ungrazed, shiny leaves can reach heights of forty to fifty inches. Seedheads normally appear between April and May depending on geographical location.

Interseeding

Bounty annual ryegrass can be interseeded with corn and other row crops to provide benefits that include the absorption of excess nitrogen, erosion reduction, and the potential to serve as a winter feed source.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 165,000 – 175,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Commonly used for overseeding into warm-season perennial ryegrass, Bounty annual ryegrass can be utilized to extend grazing seasons by three months or more for ranchers. Bounty annual ryegrass has demonstrated the ability to provide some control over soil nematodes. Highly palatable and capable of producing longer into the colder months than many other forage species, Bounty annual ryegrass is excellent for late winter and spring grazing while allowing animals to maintain exceptionally high dry matter intake. Situations containing poorly drained soils that cannot grow small grains can be productive by utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for silage and hay. In a situation resulting in stand loss, Bounty annual ryegrass can be seeded or reseeded as late as December or January. Growth will slow when average temperatures drop below 45°F.

Growth Pattern

Annual ryegrass grows in a bunch pattern with stiffer leaves near the base of the plant. When left ungrazed, shiny leaves can reach heights of forty to fifty inches. Seedheads normally appear between April and May depending on geographical location.

Interseeding

Bounty annual ryegrass can be interseeded with corn and other row crops to provide benefits that include the absorption of excess nitrogen, erosion reduction, and the potential to serve as a winter feed source.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 165,000 – 175,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Commonly used for overseeding into warm-season perennial ryegrass, Bounty annual ryegrass can be utilized to extend grazing seasons by three months or more for ranchers. Bounty annual ryegrass has demonstrated the ability to provide some control over soil nematodes. Highly palatable and capable of producing longer into the colder months than many other forage species, Bounty annual ryegrass is excellent for late winter and spring grazing while allowing animals to maintain exceptionally high dry matter intake. Situations containing poorly drained soils that cannot grow small grains can be productive by utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for silage and hay. In a situation resulting in stand loss, Bounty annual ryegrass can be seeded or reseeded as late as December or January. Growth will slow when average temperatures drop below 45°F.

Growth Pattern

Annual ryegrass grows in a bunch pattern with stiffer leaves near the base of the plant. When left ungrazed, shiny leaves can reach heights of forty to fifty inches. Seedheads normally appear between April and May depending on geographical location.

Interseeding

Bounty annual ryegrass can be interseeded with corn and other row crops to provide benefits that include the absorption of excess nitrogen, erosion reduction, and the potential to serve as a winter feed source.

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 165,000 – 175,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Bounty Annual ryegrass has adapted to a wide range of climates and soils but will grow best on dark, rich soils in mild climates with good moisture and drainage properties. Severe heat and cold along with shady and drought-prone conditions are detrimental to Bounty annual ryegrass. Tolerant of waterlogged soils, Bounty annual ryegrass will tolerate brief periods of flooding.

Soil pH: 6.0 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range: 68°F – 77°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Bounty Annual ryegrass has adapted to a wide range of climates and soils but will grow best on dark, rich soils in mild climates with good moisture and drainage properties. Severe heat and cold along with shady and drought-prone conditions are detrimental to Bounty annual ryegrass. Tolerant of waterlogged soils, Bounty annual ryegrass will tolerate brief periods of flooding.

 Soil pH: 6.0 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range: 68°F – 77°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Bounty Annual ryegrass has adapted to a wide range of climates and soils but will grow best on dark, rich soils in mild climates with good moisture and drainage properties. Severe heat and cold along with shady and drought-prone conditions are detrimental to Bounty annual ryegrass. Tolerant of waterlogged soils, Bounty annual ryegrass will tolerate brief periods of flooding.

Soil pH:  6.0 – 7.0

Optimum Growth Range:  68°F – 77°F

Establishment

Planting

Seed around late September or October depending on planting location. If later seeding into perennial grasses is necessary, lightly disking or even using a harrow before overseeding will improve the ryegrass stand and allow for earlier grazing. The best planting method is to drill Bounty annual ryegrass, however, forage broadcasting with a cultipacker also yields good success.

Seeding Depth: 0″ – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 10 days (or after the first rain)

Ideal Temp: 59°F – 65°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 100 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Seed around late September or October depending on planting location. If later seeding into perennial grasses is necessary, lightly disking or even using a harrow before overseeding will improve the ryegrass stand and allow for earlier grazing. The best planting method is to drill Bounty annual ryegrass, however, forage broadcasting with a cultipacker also yields good success.

Seeding Depth: 0″ – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 10 days (or after the first rain)

Ideal Temp: 59°F – 65°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 100 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

 Seed around late September or October depending on planting location. If later seeding into perennial grasses is necessary, lightly disking or even using a harrow before overseeding will improve the ryegrass stand and allow for earlier grazing. The best planting method is to drill Bounty annual ryegrass, however, forage broadcasting with a cultipacker also yields good success.

Seeding Depth: 0″ – ½”

Germination

Min Time To Emergence: 7 – 10 days (or after the first rain)

Ideal Temp: 59°F – 65°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 100 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

Bounty Annual ryegrass continues to produce later into the fall season than many other forage species. High digestibility, along with high protein, should occur until late April or early May. Once into May, plants become stemmy and lose palatability. Both close grazing and rotational grazing help maintain high quality, improve yield, and increase the intake of grazing animals. In the late vegetative stages, seventy percent total digestible nutrients and ten to sixteen percent crude protein are common. High quality is still available in the early stages of seedhead development, but later in the season, both quality and palatability decline. Establishment and readiness for grazing can be determined when plants have 3 – 4 leaves and cannot be easily pulled out of the ground. Bounty Annual ryegrass supports a growing cow and calf’s nutritional requirements per acre. Endophyte fungus problems are not an issue with Bounty annual ryegrass.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

At Planting: 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N after each grazing

During Winter Months: 25 Lb N/A each month in the south

Hay or Silage?

Timing: Boot – Early Heading

Cuttings During Season:

Hay: 1 – 4

Silage or Green Chop: 4 – 6

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 3″ – 4″

Rest Period: 7 – 15 days

Mixes

Mixing Bounty annual ryegrass with small grains can extend grazing by enabling grazing to begin earlier and extending the grazing season later into the year.

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Management

Grazing

Bounty Annual ryegrass continues to produce later into the fall season than many other forage species. High digestibility, along with high protein, should occur until late April or early May. Once into May, plants become stemmy and lose palatability. Both close grazing and rotational grazing help maintain high quality, improve yield, and increase the intake of grazing animals. In the late vegetative stages, seventy percent total digestible nutrients and ten to sixteen percent crude protein are common. High quality is still available in the early stages of seedhead development, but later in the season, both quality and palatability decline. Establishment and readiness for grazing can be determined when plants have 3 – 4 leaves and cannot be easily pulled out of the ground. Bounty Annual ryegrass supports a growing cow and calf’s nutritional requirements per acre. Endophyte fungus problems are not an issue with Bounty annual ryegrass.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

At Planting: 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N after each grazing

During Winter Months: 25 Lb N/A each month in the south

Hay or Silage?

Timing: Boot – Early Heading

Cuttings During Season:

Hay: 1 – 4

Silage or Green Chop: 4 – 6

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 3″ – 4″

Rest Period: 7 – 15 days

Mixes

Mixing Bounty annual ryegrass with small grains can extend grazing by enabling grazing to begin earlier and extending the grazing season later into the year.

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Management

Grazing

Bounty Annual ryegrass continues to produce later into the fall season than many other forage species. High digestibility, along with high protein, should occur until late April or early May. Once into May, plants become stemmy and lose palatability. Both close grazing and rotational grazing help maintain high quality, improve yield, and increase the intake of grazing animals. In the late vegetative stages, seventy percent total digestible nutrients and ten to sixteen percent crude protein are common. High quality is still available in the early stages of seedhead development, but later in the season, both quality and palatability decline. Establishment and readiness for grazing can be determined when plants have 3 – 4 leaves and cannot be easily pulled out of the ground. Bounty Annual ryegrass supports a growing cow and calf’s nutritional requirements per acre. Endophyte fungus problems are not an issue with Bounty annual ryegrass.

Earliest Time To Graze: 6″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

At Planting: 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 40 Lb/A N after each grazing

During Winter Months: 25 Lb N/A each month in the south

Hay or Silage

Timing: Boot – Early Heading

Cuttings During Season:

Hay: 1 – 4

Silage or Green Chop: 4 – 6

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 3″ – 4″

Rest Period: 7 – 15 days

Mixes

Mixing Bounty annual ryegrass with small grains can extend grazing by enabling grazing to begin earlier and extending the grazing season later into the year.

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Negative aspects of utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for forage are manageable. While the rapid growth and high productivity of Bounty annual ryegrass are a selling point in many cases, the temporary aggressive nature of Bounty may create difficulties for other species in permanent pasture mixtures. Southern locations have allowed animals to graze Bounty Annual Ryegrass for 2 out of 24 hrs for maximum production.

Competitiveness

When utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass, its highly competitive nature may displace other desirable plants.

Risks

High palatability creates a risk of livestock to over-consume. Utilize hay as a filler before grazing until animals have adjusted to their new diet.

Diseases

  • Crown Rust
  • Cottony Blight
  • Grey Leaf Spot

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Mole Crickets

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Negative aspects of utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for forage are manageable. While the rapid growth and high productivity of Bounty annual ryegrass are a selling point in many cases, the temporary aggressive nature of Bounty may create difficulties for other species in permanent pasture mixtures. Southern locations have allowed animals to graze Bounty Annual Ryegrass for 2 out of 24 hrs for maximum production.

Competitiveness

When utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass, its highly competitive nature may displace other desirable plants.

Risks

High palatability creates a risk of livestock to over-consume. Utilize hay as a filler before grazing until animals have adjusted to their new diet.

Diseases

  • Crown Rust
  • Cottony Blight
  • Grey Leaf Spot

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Mole Crickets

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Negative aspects of utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass for forage are manageable. While the rapid growth and high productivity of Bounty annual ryegrass are a selling point in many cases, the temporary aggressive nature of Bounty may create difficulties for other species in permanent pasture mixtures. Southern locations have allowed animals to graze Bounty Annual Ryegrass for 2 out of 24 hrs for maximum production.

Competitiveness

When utilizing Bounty annual ryegrass, its highly competitive nature may displace other desirable plants.

Risks

High palatability creates a risk of livestock to over-consume. Utilize hay as a filler before grazing until animals have adjusted to their new diet.

Diseases

  • Crown Rust
  • Cottony Blight
  • Grey Leaf Spot

Pests

  • Armyworms
  • Mole Crickets

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience