Sudangrass

Sorghum

Technical Data Sheet
Technical Data Sheet

Sudangrass

Sorghum

Sudangrass

Sorghum

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Purpose & Fit

With very high levels of crude protein and digestible nutrients, the mean minimum standards for ruminant nutrition are met on a sudangrass diet. Sudangrass silage has digestibility and nutritional quality similar to pearl millet for sheep and goats. Although about 15% – 20% lower in available energy, sudangrass possesses considerably more protein than corn silage. A versatile option for planting, sudangrass can be used for fodder, grazing, cut-and-carry, wilting, ensiling, or drying. Sudangrass is an excellent fit for producers requiring short rotations. In regions with hot, dry summers, sudangrass will have a higher carrying capacity than other grasses or legumes. Utilize sudangrass as an emergency crop should another crop fail.

Growth Pattern

Growing between 4 ft. – 7 ft. tall, sudangrass has numerous light green leaves between 4 cm. – 22 cm. long and 8 cm. – 15 cm. wide with ¼” stems. Plants do not possess rhizomes and only produce fibrous roots. Sudangrass produces many tillers speeding regrowth if injured.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 40,000 – 43,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

With very high levels of crude protein and digestible nutrients, the mean minimum standards for ruminant nutrition are met on a sudangrass diet. Sudangrass silage has digestibility and nutritional quality similar to pearl millet for sheep and goats. Although about 15% – 20% lower in available energy, sudangrass possesses considerably more protein than corn silage. A versatile option for planting, sudangrass can be used for fodder, grazing, cut-and-carry, wilting, ensiling, or drying. Sudangrass is an excellent fit for producers requiring short rotations. In regions with hot, dry summers, sudangrass will have a higher carrying capacity than other grasses or legumes. Utilize sudangrass as an emergency crop should another crop fail.

Growth Pattern

Growing between 4 ft. – 7 ft. tall, sudangrass has numerous light green leaves between 4 cm. – 22 cm. long and 8 cm. – 15 cm. wide with ¼” stems. Plants do not possess rhizomes and only produce fibrous roots. Sudangrass produces many tillers speeding regrowth if injured.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 40,000 – 43,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

With very high levels of crude protein and digestible nutrients, the mean minimum standards for ruminant nutrition are met on a sudangrass diet. Sudangrass silage has digestibility and nutritional quality similar to pearl millet for sheep and goats. Although about 15% – 20% lower in available energy, sudangrass possesses considerably more protein than corn silage. A versatile option for planting, sudangrass can be used for fodder, grazing, cut-and-carry, wilting, ensiling, or drying. Sudangrass is an excellent fit for producers requiring short rotations. In regions with hot, dry summers, sudangrass will have a higher carrying capacity than other grasses or legumes. Utilize sudangrass as an emergency crop should another crop fail.

Growth Pattern

Growing between 4 ft. – 7 ft. tall, sudangrass has numerous light green leaves between 4 cm. – 22 cm. long and 8 cm. – 15 cm. wide with ¼” stems. Plants do not possess rhizomes and only produce fibrous roots. Sudangrass produces many tillers speeding regrowth if injured.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 40,000 – 43,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Growing in a range of soils that span from heavy clay to sandy, sudangrass shines in soils that are well-drained and fertile. While being tolerant of drought, extended periods will cause wilting. Not a friend of the cold, sudangrass will go dormant in the winter if not winterkilled outright.

Soil pH: 5.8 – 7.5

Optimum Growth Range: 60°F+

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Growing in a range of soils that span from heavy clay to sandy, sudangrass shines in soils that are well-drained and fertile. While being tolerant of drought, extended periods will cause wilting. Not a friend of the cold, sudangrass will go dormant in the winter if not winterkilled outright.

Soil pH: 5.8 – 7.5

Optimum Growth Range: 60°F+

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Growing in a range of soils that span from heavy clay to sandy, sudangrass shines in soils that are well-drained and fertile. While being tolerant of drought, extended periods will cause wilting. Not a friend of the cold, sudangrass will go dormant in the winter if not winterkilled outright.

Soil pH: 5.8 – 7.5

Optimum Growth Range: 60°F+

Establishment

Planting

Sow sudangrass when there is no chance of frost for the area (about three weeks after recommended corn planting for your location). Sudangrass does well when no-tilled into stubble in 6” – 7” row spacing for hay harvest or 18” – 20” in rows for grazing. Stagger planting dates to gain flexibility with maturity stages for grazing or green-chop harvest.

Seeding Depth: ¾” – 2″

Germination

 Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 20 – 30 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Sow sudangrass when there is no chance of frost for the area (about three weeks after recommended corn planting for your location). Sudangrass does well when no-tilled into stubble in 6” – 7” row spacing for hay harvest or 18” – 20” in rows for grazing. Stagger planting dates to gain flexibility with maturity stages for grazing or green-chop harvest.

Seeding Depth: ¾” – 2″

Germination

 Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 20 – 30 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Sow sudangrass when there is no chance of frost for the area (about three weeks after recommended corn planting for your location). Sudangrass does well when no-tilled into stubble in 6” – 7” row spacing for hay harvest or 18” – 20” in rows for grazing. Stagger planting dates to gain flexibility with maturity stages for grazing or green-chop harvest.

Seeding Depth: ¾” – 2″

Germination

 Min Time To Emergence: 10 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 85°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 20 – 30 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

While sudangrass does have the potential to cause prussic acid poisoning, risks can be managed by waiting to graze or cut for green chop until the plant is at least 18” – 20” tall. Avoid allowing animals to graze on sudangrass after a drought or for ten days after a killing frost. Dhurrin, the chemical that causes prussic acid poisoning, is highest in young plants, which may still emerge after a drought or frost.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″ – 20″

Fertilizer Requirements

Excessive nitrogen fertilization could lead to an increased likelihood of prussic acid poisoning or nitrate poisoning. Dark green plant growth will be an indicator of the probability of prussic acid poisoning.

At Planting: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Sudangrass will make excellent hay due to its slender culms. Prussic acid concerns dwindle when utilizing Sudangrass for hay or silage vs. grazing. Curing processes destroy prussic acid, making hay and silage seldom toxic even in situations where the original forage was. Storing green chop stored in an enclosed area is potentially harmful as heat tends to release prussic acid. Store Sudangrass green chop in an open space or wait several days after removing from storage to avoid potential issues. Smaller stems will give better drying characteristics.

Timing: Soft-Dough Stage

Cuttings During Season: 5

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 6″ – 8″

Rest Period: 3 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Pearl Millet

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 3 – 5

Management

Grazing

While sudangrass does have the potential to cause prussic acid poisoning, risks can be managed by waiting to graze or cut for green chop until the plant is at least 18” – 20” tall. Avoid allowing animals to graze on sudangrass after a drought or for ten days after a killing frost. Dhurrin, the chemical that causes prussic acid poisoning, is highest in young plants, which may still emerge after a drought or frost.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″ – 20″

Fertilizer Requirements

Excessive nitrogen fertilization could lead to an increased likelihood of prussic acid poisoning or nitrate poisoning. Dark green plant growth will be an indicator of the probability of prussic acid poisoning.

At Planting: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage?

Sudangrass will make excellent hay due to its slender culms. Prussic acid concerns dwindle when utilizing Sudangrass for hay or silage vs. grazing. Curing processes destroy prussic acid, making hay and silage seldom toxic even in situations where the original forage was. Storing green chop stored in an enclosed area is potentially harmful as heat tends to release prussic acid. Store Sudangrass green chop in an open space or wait several days after removing from storage to avoid potential issues. Smaller stems will give better drying characteristics.

Timing: Soft-Dough Stage

Cuttings During Season: 5

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 6″ – 8″

Rest Period: 3 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Pearl Millet

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 3 – 5

Management

Grazing

While sudangrass does have the potential to cause prussic acid poisoning, risks can be managed by waiting to graze or cut for green chop until the plant is at least 18” – 20” tall. Avoid allowing animals to graze on sudangrass after a drought or for ten days after a killing frost. Dhurrin, the chemical that causes prussic acid poisoning, is highest in young plants, which may still emerge after a drought or frost.

Earliest Time To Graze: 18″ – 20″

Fertilizer Requirements

Excessive nitrogen fertilization could lead to an increased likelihood of prussic acid poisoning or nitrate poisoning. Dark green plant growth will be an indicator of the probability of prussic acid poisoning.

At Planting: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: 110 Lb/A N – 130 Lb/A N

Hay or Silage

Sudangrass will make excellent hay due to its slender culms. Prussic acid concerns dwindle when utilizing Sudangrass for hay or silage vs. grazing. Curing processes destroy prussic acid, making hay and silage seldom toxic even in situations where the original forage was. Storing green chop stored in an enclosed area is potentially harmful as heat tends to release prussic acid. Store Sudangrass green chop in an open space or wait several days after removing from storage to avoid potential issues. Smaller stems will give better drying characteristics.

Timing: Soft-Dough Stage

Cuttings During Season: 5

Recovery

Minimum Graze Height: 6″ – 8″

Rest Period: 3 – 4 weeks

Mixes

  • Pearl Millet

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 3 – 5

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Requires annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Due to the quick emergence and growth, herbicides are not usually needed.

Risks

Sudangrass has the potential to release prussic acid. Fertilizer management and wilting before feeding can mitigate risks. Utilize sulfur block supplements and avoid harvesting basal stalks or grazing after a killing frost or extensive drought to mitigate prussic acid dangers. Copper levels can be a concern when grazing sheep. Sudangrass can be injured by applications of 2,4-D.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Ascochyta Leaf Spot
  • Bacterial Stripe
  • Bacterial Leaf Blight
  • Ergot
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Downy Mildew

Pests

  • Cutworms
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Greenbugs

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Requires annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Due to the quick emergence and growth, herbicides are not usually needed.

Risks

Sudangrass has the potential to release prussic acid. Fertilizer management and wilting before feeding can mitigate risks. Utilize sulfur block supplements and avoid harvesting basal stalks or grazing after a killing frost or extensive drought to mitigate prussic acid dangers. Copper levels can be a concern when grazing sheep. Sudangrass can be injured by applications of 2,4-D.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Ascochyta Leaf Spot
  • Bacterial Stripe
  • Bacterial Leaf Blight
  • Ergot
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Downy Mildew

Pests

  • Cutworms
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Greenbugs

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Requires annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Due to the quick emergence and growth, herbicides are not usually needed.

Risks

Sudangrass has the potential to release prussic acid. Fertilizer management and wilting before feeding can mitigate risks. Utilize sulfur block supplements and avoid harvesting basal stalks or grazing after a killing frost or extensive drought to mitigate prussic acid dangers. Copper levels can be a concern when grazing sheep. Sudangrass can be injured by applications of 2,4-D.

Diseases

  • Anthracnose
  • Ascochyta Leaf Spot
  • Bacterial Stripe
  • Bacterial Leaf Blight
  • Ergot
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Downy Mildew

Pests

  • Cutworms
  • Grasshoppers
  • Chinch Bugs
  • Greenbugs

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience