Arrowleaf Clover

Trifolium vesiculosum

Technical Data Sheet
Technical Data Sheet

Arrowleaf Clover

Trifolium vesiculosum

Arrowleaf Clover

Trifolium vesiculosum

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Purpose & Fit

Late maturing, arrowleaf clover will produce forage later in the spring than crimson or subterranean clover. Also attributed to its late-maturing qualities, arrowleaf clover will have less forage in the fall and winter than other clovers.

Growth Pattern

The deep taproot of arrowleaf clover can penetrate up to 4 ½ feet with upright stems growing from a leafy rosette curving upward between 2 – 4 feet. Arrowleaf stems are hollow and non-hairy with a white ‘V’ watermark. Leaf petioles are between 3 – 8 inches in length, and a white cylindrical-shaped flower will turn pink or purple through maturity. Florets produce two or three seeds that are about twice the size of white clover seed. With a later maturity, arrowleaf clover will continue to grow until early July.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Arrowleaf clover at one point was referred to as blister clover.

Seeds/Lb: 400,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Late maturing, arrowleaf clover will produce forage later in the spring than crimson or subterranean clover. Also attributed to its late-maturing qualities, arrowleaf clover will have less forage in the fall and winter than other clovers.

Growth Pattern

The deep taproot of arrowleaf clover can penetrate up to 4 ½ feet with upright stems growing from a leafy rosette curving upward between 2 – 4 feet. Arrowleaf stems are hollow and non-hairy with a white ‘V’ watermark. Leaf petioles are between 3 – 8 inches in length, and a white cylindrical-shaped flower will turn pink or purple through maturity. Florets produce two or three seeds that are about twice the size of white clover seed. With a later maturity, arrowleaf clover will continue to grow until early July.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Arrowleaf clover at one point was referred to as blister clover.

Seeds/Lb: 400,000

Description

Purpose & Fit

Late maturing, arrowleaf clover will produce forage later in the spring than crimson or subterranean clover. Also attributed to its late-maturing qualities, arrowleaf clover will have less forage in the fall and winter than other clovers.

Growth Pattern

The deep taproot of arrowleaf clover can penetrate up to 4 ½ feet with upright stems growing from a leafy rosette curving upward between 2 – 4 feet. Arrowleaf stems are hollow and non-hairy with a white ‘V’ watermark. Leaf petioles are between 3 – 8 inches in length, and a white cylindrical-shaped flower will turn pink or purple through maturity. Florets produce two or three seeds that are about twice the size of white clover seed. With a later maturity, arrowleaf clover will continue to grow until early July.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Arrowleaf clover at one point was referred to as blister clover.

Seeds/Lb: 400,000

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Arrowleaf clover will require between 36 – 40 inches minimum annual precipitation or irrigation on well-drained loam, sandy-loam, or clay soils. Intolerant of poorly drained soils, acidic soils, low fertility, and locations prone to drought, its flooding tolerance is between 3 – 6 days if not actively vegetative.

Soil pH: 5.6 – 8.4

Optimum Growth Range: 96°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Arrowleaf clover will require between 36 – 40 inches minimum annual precipitation or irrigation on well-drained loam, sandy-loam, or clay soils. Intolerant of poorly drained soils, acidic soils, low fertility, and locations prone to drought, its flooding tolerance is between 3 – 6 days if not actively vegetative.

Soil pH: 5.6 – 8.4

Optimum Growth Range: 96°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Arrowleaf clover will require between 36 – 40 inches minimum annual precipitation or irrigation on well-drained loam, sandy-loam, or clay soils. Intolerant of poorly drained soils, acidic soils, low fertility, and locations prone to drought, its flooding tolerance is between 3 – 6 days if not actively vegetative.

Soil pH: 5.6 – 8.4

Optimum Growth Range: 96°F

Establishment

Planting

Sod-seeding into warm-season perennial pastures is a recommended practice to achieve spring grazing. Plant using a drill with the small seed box or broadcast with appropriate modifications for smaller seeds using a broadcast seeder. Clip existing pastures to a 2-inch stubble height before seeding into a prepared seedbed.

Arrowleaf produces high amounts of hard seed, making it an excellent reseeder if permitted. To allow reseeding, remove animals, or reduce stocking rates when it begins to flower.

Higher germination rates occur during cooler temperatures. During elevated temperatures, germination is considerably less than that of crimson clover. These cooler temperatures will still allow for sufficient germination, meaning late fall seeding could result in better stands with adequate moisture than spring seedings.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Arrowleaf will need scarification for adequate germination. Maturation will occur about two months later than crimson clover.

Min Time To Emergence: <7 days (under ideal moisture and temperature conditions)

Ideal Temp: 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 12 lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Sod-seeding into warm-season perennial pastures is a recommended practice to achieve spring grazing. Plant using a drill with the small seed box or broadcast with appropriate modifications for smaller seeds using a broadcast seeder. Clip existing pastures to a 2-inch stubble height before seeding into a prepared seedbed.

Arrowleaf produces high amounts of hard seed, making it an excellent reseeder if permitted. To allow reseeding, remove animals, or reduce stocking rates when it begins to flower.

Higher germination rates occur during cooler temperatures. During elevated temperatures, germination is considerably less than that of crimson clover. These cooler temperatures will still allow for sufficient germination, meaning late fall seeding could result in better stands with adequate moisture than spring seedings.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Arrowleaf will need scarification for adequate germination. Maturation will occur about two months later than crimson clover.

Min Time To Emergence: <7 days (under ideal moisture and temperature conditions)

Ideal Temp: 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 12 lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Sod-seeding into warm-season perennial pastures is a recommended practice to achieve spring grazing. Plant using a drill with the small seed box or broadcast with appropriate modifications for smaller seeds using a broadcast seeder. Clip existing pastures to a 2-inch stubble height before seeding into a prepared seedbed.

Arrowleaf produces high amounts of hard seed, making it an excellent reseeder if permitted. To allow reseeding, remove animals, or reduce stocking rates when it begins to flower.

Higher germination rates occur during cooler temperatures. During elevated temperatures, germination is considerably less than that of crimson clover. These cooler temperatures will still allow for sufficient germination, meaning late fall seeding could result in better stands with adequate moisture than spring seedings.

Seeding Depth: ¼” – ½”

Germination

Arrowleaf will need scarification for adequate germination. Maturation will occur about two months later than crimson clover.

Min Time To Emergence: <7 days (under ideal moisture and temperature conditions)

Ideal Temp: 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 5 – 12 lb/A

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur until late May, with digestibility remaining high until maturity. Arrowleaf clover should be kept short during grazing. Keeping it short will improve light and air movement through the canopy, keeping productivity high and reducing disease problems. Bloat potential is minor with arrowleaf clover.

Earliest Time To Graze: 8″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply Boron at a rate of 2 lb/A in areas that require reseeding. An additional application of about 60 lb/A N may be beneficial in late winter.

At Planting: 60 lb/A N (early fall), 20 – 30 lb/A N (late fall)

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage?

If cut only one time in the hay stage, arrowleaf clover yields have averaged 2 – 3 times that of crimson clover. A 4-inch cut height will decrease the possibility of crown and stem rot infection.

Timing: Bloom Stage

Cuttings During Season: 1 – 3

Recovery

Provided it hasn’t been cut or grazed too short, and with access to sufficient moisture, arrowleaf clover recovers well.

Minimum Graze Height: 2″ – 6″

Rest Period: 10 – 20 days

Mixes

  • Rye
  • Ryegrass
  • Cool Season Annual Grasses
  • Small Grains

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur until late May, with digestibility remaining high until maturity. Arrowleaf clover should be kept short during grazing. Keeping it short will improve light and air movement through the canopy, keeping productivity high and reducing disease problems. Bloat potential is minor with arrowleaf clover.

Earliest Time To Graze: 8″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply Boron at a rate of 2 lb/A in areas that require reseeding. An additional application of about 60 lb/A N may be beneficial in late winter.

At Planting: 60 lb/A N (early fall), 20 – 30 lb/A N (late fall)

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage?

If cut only one time in the hay stage, arrowleaf clover yields have averaged 2 – 3 times that of crimson clover. A 4-inch cut height will decrease the possibility of crown and stem rot infection.

Timing: Bloom Stage

Cuttings During Season: 1 – 3

Recovery

Provided it hasn’t been cut or grazed too short, and with access to sufficient moisture, arrowleaf clover recovers well.

Minimum Graze Height: 2″ – 6″

Rest Period: 10 – 20 days

Mixes

  • Rye
  • Ryegrass
  • Cool Season Annual Grasses
  • Small Grains

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur until late May, with digestibility remaining high until maturity. Arrowleaf clover should be kept short during grazing. Keeping it short will improve light and air movement through the canopy, keeping productivity high and reducing disease problems. Bloat potential is minor with arrowleaf clover.

Earliest Time To Graze: 8″ – 10″

Fertilizer Requirements

Apply Boron at a rate of 2 lb/A in areas that require reseeding. An additional application of about 60 lb/A N may be beneficial in late winter.

At Planting: 60 lb/A N (early fall), 20 – 30 lb/A N (late fall)

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage

If cut only one time in the hay stage, arrowleaf clover yields have averaged 2 – 3 times that of crimson clover. A 4-inch cut height will decrease the possibility of crown and stem rot infection.

Timing: Bloom Stage

Cuttings During Season: 1 – 3

Recovery

Provided it hasn’t been cut or grazed too short, and with access to sufficient moisture, arrowleaf clover recovers well.

Minimum Graze Height: 2″ – 6″

Rest Period: 10 – 20 days

Mixes

  • Rye
  • Ryegrass
  • Cool Season Annual Grasses
  • Small Grains

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 4

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Arrowleaf clover will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Arrowleaf clover has vigorous spring growth and, if left alone, can outcompete the early spring growth of perennial grasses. Graze arrowleaf clover in the spring to prevent full canopies from developing over warm-season grasses.

Risks

There is some risk of bloat when utilizing Arrowleaf Clover for forage.

Diseases

Purpling of the leaves is a sign of stress from fertility problems, cold stress, or disease.

  • Crown Rot
  • Stem Rot

Pests

  • Wireworms
  • Seed Weevils
  • Thrips
  • Clover Seed Chalcid
  • Aphids

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Arrowleaf clover will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Arrowleaf clover has vigorous spring growth and, if left alone, can outcompete the early spring growth of perennial grasses. Graze arrowleaf clover in the spring to prevent full canopies from developing over warm-season grasses.

Risks

There is some risk of bloat when utilizing Arrowleaf Clover for forage.

Diseases

Purpling of the leaves is a sign of stress from fertility problems, cold stress, or disease.

  • Crown Rot
  • Stem Rot

Pests

  • Wireworms
  • Seed Weevils
  • Thrips
  • Clover Seed Chalcid
  • Aphids

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

Arrowleaf clover will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

Arrowleaf clover has vigorous spring growth and, if left alone, can outcompete the early spring growth of perennial grasses. Graze arrowleaf clover in the spring to prevent full canopies from developing over warm-season grasses.

Risks

There is some risk of bloat when utilizing Arrowleaf Clover for forage.

Diseases

Purpling of the leaves is a sign of stress from fertility problems, cold stress, or disease.

  • Crown Rot
  • Stem Rot

Pests

  • Wireworms
  • Seed Weevils
  • Thrips
  • Clover Seed Chalcid
  • Aphids

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience