TS7

Spring Pea

Pisum sativum

Technical Data Sheet
Technical Data Sheet

TS7

Spring Pea

Pisum sativum

TS7

Spring Pea

Pisum sativum

Technical Data Sheet

Description

Purpose & Fit

High protein content and palatability of ensiled forage are some of the defining traits of TS7 peas. TS7 peas are used both in double-cropping when precipitation is adequate and finishing diets to improve the tenderness, juiciness, and beef flavor. They are an excellent pellet binder and require less moisture than other forage crops. A perfect replacement for winter-killed alfalfa, utilize TS7 peas in high feed intake creep feeding.

When utilized in rotations with cereals, TS7 peas can provide necessary disease breaks. A standout choice as a high-yielding, short-term crop with high protein content, peas shine particularly well in temperate areas. Options for use in a forage system are to feed them fresh (grazed or green chop) or ensiled. TS7 peas maintain stable rumen conditions and digest slowly and thoroughly. Containing the same energy value as corn but with nearly three times the protein, TS7 peas provide better total feed value than many other feeds. Leaves and pods account for the majority of digestible dry matter. Pea crops can reduce fertilizer requirements by 27 lbs./A – 45 lbs./A, and 3-year rotations that include peas can result in 125lb/A nitrogen savings. Winter wheat will make an excellent crop following TS7 peas.

Growth Pattern

Taproots will grow up to three feet with numerous shallow lateral roots. Bushy or climbing with smooth, round, slender stems, vines may exceed five feet at maturity. White, pink, or purple flowers indicate the tannin content in the seed with white flowers indicative of tannin-free seed.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 2,000 – 3,500

Description

Purpose & Fit

High protein content and palatability of ensiled forage are some of the defining traits of TS7 peas. TS7 peas are used both in double-cropping when precipitation is adequate and finishing diets to improve the tenderness, juiciness, and beef flavor. They are an excellent pellet binder and require less moisture than other forage crops. A perfect replacement for winter-killed alfalfa, utilize TS7 peas in high feed intake creep feeding.

When utilized in rotations with cereals, TS7 peas can provide necessary disease breaks. A standout choice as a high-yielding, short-term crop with high protein content, peas shine particularly well in temperate areas. Options for use in a forage system are to feed them fresh (grazed or green chop) or ensiled. TS7 peas maintain stable rumen conditions and digest slowly and thoroughly. Containing the same energy value as corn but with nearly three times the protein, TS7 peas provide better total feed value than many other feeds. Leaves and pods account for the majority of digestible dry matter. Pea crops can reduce fertilizer requirements by 27 lbs./A – 45 lbs./A, and 3-year rotations that include peas can result in 125lb/A nitrogen savings. Winter wheat will make an excellent crop following TS7 peas.

Growth Pattern

Taproots will grow up to three feet with numerous shallow lateral roots. Bushy or climbing with smooth, round, slender stems, vines may exceed five feet at maturity. White, pink, or purple flowers indicate the tannin content in the seed with white flowers indicative of tannin-free seed.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 2,000 – 3,500

Description

Purpose & Fit

High protein content and palatability of ensiled forage are some of the defining traits of TS7 peas. TS7 peas are used both in double-cropping when precipitation is adequate and finishing diets to improve the tenderness, juiciness, and beef flavor. They are an excellent pellet binder and require less moisture than other forage crops. A perfect replacement for winter-killed alfalfa, utilize TS7 peas in high feed intake creep feeding.

When utilized in rotations with cereals, TS7 peas can provide necessary disease breaks. A standout choice as a high-yielding, short-term crop with high protein content, peas shine particularly well in temperate areas. Options for use in a forage system are to feed them fresh (grazed or green chop) or ensiled. TS7 peas maintain stable rumen conditions and digest slowly and thoroughly. Containing the same energy value as corn but with nearly three times the protein, TS7 peas provide better total feed value than many other feeds. Leaves and pods account for the majority of digestible dry matter. Pea crops can reduce fertilizer requirements by 27 lbs./A – 45 lbs./A, and 3-year rotations that include peas can result in 125lb/A nitrogen savings. Winter wheat will make an excellent crop following TS7 peas.

Growth Pattern

Taproots will grow up to three feet with numerous shallow lateral roots. Bushy or climbing with smooth, round, slender stems, vines may exceed five feet at maturity. White, pink, or purple flowers indicate the tannin content in the seed with white flowers indicative of tannin-free seed.

Interseeding

Not Recommended

Did You Know?

Seeds/Lb: 2,000 – 3,500

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Annual rainfall or precipitation of 30” – 40” is needed. With adequate drainage, growth is possible on a wide range of soils. Typically frost resistant and requiring only 100 days to maturity, plant TS7 peas as a spring crop in areas usually too cold for peas. TS7 peas will continue growing in temperatures down to 26°F and will do well on calcareous soils. Although they can withstand heavy frosts, they succumb quickly to heat and drought, especially during the flowering period. While shade tolerant, TS7 peas do not tolerate acidic soils, high aluminum soils, and areas prone to waterlogging.

Soil pH: 5.5 – 8.7

Optimum Growth Range: 45°F – 75°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Annual rainfall or precipitation of 30” – 40” is needed. With adequate drainage, growth is possible on a wide range of soils. Typically frost resistant and requiring only 100 days to maturity, plant TS7 peas as a spring crop in areas usually too cold for peas. TS7 peas will continue growing in temperatures down to 26°F and will do well on calcareous soils. Although they can withstand heavy frosts, they succumb quickly to heat and drought, especially during the flowering period. While shade tolerant, TS7 peas do not tolerate acidic soils, high aluminum soils, and areas prone to waterlogging.

Soil pH: 5.5 – 8.7

Optimum Growth Range: 45°F – 75°F

Adaptation

Climate & Soil

Annual rainfall or precipitation of 30” – 40” is needed. With adequate drainage, growth is possible on a wide range of soils. Typically frost resistant and requiring only 100 days to maturity, plant TS7 peas as a spring crop in areas usually too cold for peas. TS7 peas will continue growing in temperatures down to 26°F and will do well on calcareous soils. Although they can withstand heavy frosts, they succumb quickly to heat and drought, especially during the flowering period. While shade tolerant, TS7 peas do not tolerate acidic soils, high aluminum soils, and areas prone to waterlogging.

Soil pH: 5.5 – 8.7

Optimum Growth Range: 45°F – 75°F

Establishment

Planting

Plant rows between 12” and 24” apart. Growth is slow during cold weather but picks up in the spring. When broadcast seeding, sow crop thickly or with a nurse crop to prevent pea plants from falling and rotting. Spring drill TS7 peas as soon as possible in the season when cool, moist conditions are forecasted.

Seeding Depth: ½” – 2½”

Germination

Spring peas should mature in 52 – 100 days after planting.

Min Time To Emergence: 10 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 150 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Plant rows between 12” and 24” apart. Growth is slow during cold weather but picks up in the spring. When broadcast seeding, sow crop thickly or with a nurse crop to prevent pea plants from falling and rotting. Spring drill TS7 peas as soon as possible in the season when cool, moist conditions are forecasted.

Seeding Depth: ½” – 2½”

Germination

Spring peas should mature in 52 – 100 days after planting.

Min Time To Emergence: 10 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 150 Lb/A

Establishment

Planting

Plant rows between 12” and 24” apart. Growth is slow during cold weather but picks up in the spring. When broadcast seeding, sow crop thickly or with a nurse crop to prevent pea plants from falling and rotting. Spring drill TS7 peas as soon as possible in the season when cool, moist conditions are forecasted.

Seeding Depth: ½” – 2½”

Germination

Spring peas should mature in 52 – 100 days after planting.

Min Time To Emergence: 10 – 14 days

Ideal Temp: 60°F – 70°F

Seeding Rate

Monoculture: 80 – 150 Lb/A

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur in the late fall and should be limited to 2.5 to 3 hours a day, with rotation to a crop rich in energy or low in protein.

Earliest Time To Graze: 10″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

Unresponsive to fertilizers, TS7 peas do benefit from additional phosphorus or potassium. If soil test data is not available, place 26 lb./A phosphorus, 66 lb./A potassium, and 30 lb/A sulfur before planting.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N – 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage?

Able to provide both starch and protein, use peas as whole-crop silage. Harvesting pea silage at the end of flowering will result in the lowest starch digestibility. Pea and soybean silage are similar in nutritional content. A comparison of pea silage and barley silage resulted in similar milk composition. Higher fat and lower protein occurred in an examination of milk produced by cows grazed on pea silage compared to animals fed alfalfa silage. Immature seeds within the fodder can lower dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk protein yield. If utilized for straw, pea straw lands somewhere between a cereal straw and grass hay. Harvest should occur immediately after threshing to avoid the accumulation of dirt. Fungal treatments will increase N content and decrease cell wall contents.

Timing: Flowering or Flat Pod

Cuttings During Season: 1

Recovery

Recovery is poor after mowing or grazing.

Minimum Graze Height: Not Applicable

Rest Period: Not Applicable

Mixes

Mix TS7 Peas at a ratio of 70% peas: 30% cereal grains to increase dry matter at the cost of crude protein. Finding a variety partner that matures at the same rate under the particular agronomic environment is essential in maximizing yield.

  • Oats
  • Cereals

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 15

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur in the late fall and should be limited to 2.5 to 3 hours a day, with rotation to a crop rich in energy or low in protein.

Earliest Time To Graze: 10″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

Unresponsive to fertilizers, TS7 peas do benefit from additional phosphorus or potassium. If soil test data is not available, place 26 lb./A phosphorus, 66 lb./A potassium, and 30 lb/A sulfur before planting.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N – 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage?

Able to provide both starch and protein, use peas as whole-crop silage. Harvesting pea silage at the end of flowering will result in the lowest starch digestibility. Pea and soybean silage are similar in nutritional content. A comparison of pea silage and barley silage resulted in similar milk composition. Higher fat and lower protein occurred in an examination of milk produced by cows grazed on pea silage compared to animals fed alfalfa silage. Immature seeds within the fodder can lower dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk protein yield. If utilized for straw, pea straw lands somewhere between a cereal straw and grass hay. Harvest should occur immediately after threshing to avoid the accumulation of dirt. Fungal treatments will increase N content and decrease cell wall contents.

Timing: Flowering or Flat Pod

Cuttings During Season: 1

Recovery

Recovery is poor after mowing or grazing.

Minimum Graze Height: Not Applicable

Rest Period: Not Applicable

Mixes

Mix TS7 Peas at a ratio of 70% peas: 30% cereal grains to increase dry matter at the cost of crude protein. Finding a variety partner that matures at the same rate under the particular agronomic environment is essential in maximizing yield.

  • Oats
  • Cereals

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 15

Management

Grazing

Grazing can occur in the late fall and should be limited to 2.5 to 3 hours a day, with rotation to a crop rich in energy or low in protein.

Earliest Time To Graze: 10″ – 12″

Fertilizer Requirements

Unresponsive to fertilizers, TS7 peas do benefit from additional phosphorus or potassium. If soil test data is not available, place 26 lb./A phosphorus, 66 lb./A potassium, and 30 lb/A sulfur before planting.

At Planting: 15 Lb/A N – 25 Lb/A N

During Grazing Season: Not Applicable

Hay or Silage

Able to provide both starch and protein, use peas as whole-crop silage. Harvesting pea silage at the end of flowering will result in the lowest starch digestibility. Pea and soybean silage are similar in nutritional content. A comparison of pea silage and barley silage resulted in similar milk composition. Higher fat and lower protein occurred in an examination of milk produced by cows grazed on pea silage compared to animals fed alfalfa silage. Immature seeds within the fodder can lower dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk protein yield. If utilized for straw, pea straw lands somewhere between a cereal straw and grass hay. Harvest should occur immediately after threshing to avoid the accumulation of dirt. Fungal treatments will increase N content and decrease cell wall contents.

Timing: Flowering or Flat Pod

Cuttings During Season: 1

Recovery

Recovery is poor after mowing or grazing.

Minimum Graze Height: Not Applicable

Rest Period: Not Applicable

Mixes

Mix TS7 Peas at a ratio of 70% peas: 30% cereal grains to increase dry matter at the cost of crude protein. Finding a variety partner that matures at the same rate under the particular agronomic environment is essential in maximizing yield.

  • Oats
  • Cereals

Yields

Tons of Dry Matter/A: 2 – 15

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

TS7 peas will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

When planting into an established sward, shading is a concern. Graze down established pastures to allow enough light to reach TS7 seedlings. TS7 seedlings are more resilient than vetch or clover seedlings.

Risks

Tannins, saponins, and mold are of concern when utilizing peas for forage. If a defoliant is applied prior to harvest, delay harvest by 5 days.

Diseases

Pests

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

TS7 peas will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

When planting into an established sward, shading is a concern. Graze down established pastures to allow enough light to reach TS7 seedlings. TS7 seedlings are more resilient than vetch or clover seedlings.

Risks

Tannins, saponins, and mold are of concern when utilizing peas for forage. If a defoliant is applied prior to harvest, delay harvest by 5 days.

Diseases

Pests

Considerations

Permanent Pasture

TS7 peas will require annual seeding.

Competitiveness

When planting into an established sward, shading is a concern. Graze down established pastures to allow enough light to reach TS7 seedlings. TS7 seedlings are more resilient than vetch or clover seedlings.

Risks

Tannins, saponins, and mold are of concern when utilizing peas for forage. If a defoliant is applied prior to harvest, delay harvest by 5 days.

Diseases

Pests

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience

Please Note:

All information provided is the result of research, our own experience, or the experiences shared by our customers.

We strongly encourage consulting additional resources before planting to ensure the best fit for your location and needs.

Questions or Advice
Share Your Experience